Bruno D'Amicis - Chamois chase

Bruno D'Amicis - Chamois chase

Only a few hundreds Tatra chamois still survive in the homonymous mountain range between Poland and Slovakia. I desperately needed some good chamois shots for my book project about the wilderness of Tichá Valley and wanted to pursue these animals during the autumnal rut to get some behavior on film. The mating season for the chamois across the whole range of the species usually falls between November and December. Even the beginning of November, in the Tatras, usually means a lot of snow... To reach the ridge where I spotted a little herd of chamois, I had to hike for more than 4 hours, in knee-deep snow and with temperatures well below zero. Every three steps, I thought of heading back. Before approaching the wary animals, it took some time to let them accustomed to my presence (in the meanwhile, the slope was so steep and slippery, that I had to lay on my belly!) In a bit less than three hours I could witness all the antics related to the rut and the peak of action was reached when a male started chasing off a competitor from the herd of females: they run up and down in 5 minutes a slope it would have took a person half day to climb. As the day was ending it was time for me to go back: I then realized the whole slope was frozen and very dangerous. I finally arrived much later dinner time, and I was exhausted but happy

Location: Slovakia

Posted on 15.02.2011
Photo info - November 2007: Canon EOS 40D, Canon EF L IS USM 300 f/2,8 + 2X converter, tripod
Tags: bruno damicis endangered mountains rupicapra rupicapra tatrica tatra tatra chamois winter wildlife photography
Bruno D'Amicis - Chamois chase

Bruno D'Amicis - Chamois chase

Only a few hundreds Tatra chamois still survive in the homonymous mountain range between Poland and Slovakia. I desperately needed some good chamois shots for my book project about the wilderness of Tichá Valley and wanted to pursue these animals during the autumnal rut to get some behavior on film. The mating season for the chamois across the whole range of the species usually falls between November and December. Even the beginning of November, in the Tatras, usually means a lot of snow... To reach the ridge where I spotted a little herd of chamois, I had to hike for more than 4 hours, in knee-deep snow and with temperatures well below zero. Every three steps, I thought of heading back. Before approaching the wary animals, it took some time to let them accustomed to my presence (in the meanwhile, the slope was so steep and slippery, that I had to lay on my belly!) In a bit less than three hours I could witness all the antics related to the rut and the peak of action was reached when a male started chasing off a competitor from the herd of females: they run up and down in 5 minutes a slope it would have took a person half day to climb. As the day was ending it was time for me to go back: I then realized the whole slope was frozen and very dangerous. I finally arrived much later dinner time, and I was exhausted but happy

Location: Slovakia

Posted on 15.02.2011
Photo info - November 2007: Canon EOS 40D, Canon EF L IS USM 300 f/2,8 + 2X converter, tripod
Tags: bruno damicis endangered mountains rupicapra rupicapra tatrica tatra tatra chamois winter wildlife photography