Roy Mangersnes - Call of the

Roy Mangersnes - Call of the "wild"

I am currently working on a book on wildlife close to town, and it brings me to reflect on the term "wildlife". As an example I chose the Ring-necked Pheasant. It was brought to Europe from Asia over 1000 years ago as a domestic bird. Since then it has become a more or less natural part of the European avifauna. In Norway the pheasant is hunted for only two weeks of the year to maintain a stable population, and at the same time Wild Boar are being shot freely when they cross the border naturally from Sweden. In my country we have similar conservation dilemmas concerning the Mute Swan and Canada Goose; they were originally a domestic bird but is now colonizing and spreading across the country, and they are managed as part of our natural world. In central Europe I believe the list is even longer - not to mention the UK which almost only consists of introduced or at best re-introduced species. The question I would like to raise is; when does a domestic animal become wildlife? Can they become a wild animal at all? Should we let them considdering some have very damaging effects on local species. I believe the answers will be very different in the different countries, and I would love to hear your thoughts.

Location: Stavanger, Norway

Posted on 02.06.2011
Photo info - 13.05.2010: NIKON D3S, 1000 mm, ISO 250, f 8, 1/200 sec
Tags: plumage Ring-necked Pheasant Roy Mangersnes wildlife photography
Roy Mangersnes - Call of the

Roy Mangersnes - Call of the "wild"

I am currently working on a book on wildlife close to town, and it brings me to reflect on the term "wildlife". As an example I chose the Ring-necked Pheasant. It was brought to Europe from Asia over 1000 years ago as a domestic bird. Since then it has become a more or less natural part of the European avifauna. In Norway the pheasant is hunted for only two weeks of the year to maintain a stable population, and at the same time Wild Boar are being shot freely when they cross the border naturally from Sweden. In my country we have similar conservation dilemmas concerning the Mute Swan and Canada Goose; they were originally a domestic bird but is now colonizing and spreading across the country, and they are managed as part of our natural world. In central Europe I believe the list is even longer - not to mention the UK which almost only consists of introduced or at best re-introduced species. The question I would like to raise is; when does a domestic animal become wildlife? Can they become a wild animal at all? Should we let them considdering some have very damaging effects on local species. I believe the answers will be very different in the different countries, and I would love to hear your thoughts.

Location: Stavanger, Norway

Posted on 02.06.2011
Photo info - 13.05.2010: NIKON D3S, 1000 mm, ISO 250, f 8, 1/200 sec
Tags: plumage Ring-necked Pheasant Roy Mangersnes wildlife photography