Bruno D'Amicis - Prey exchange

 

Although well distributed in Africa and Middle East, the Lanner falcon is an absolute rarity in Europe. A bunch of pairs of this beautiful falcon still breed in central and southern Italy. Quite differently from the similar Peregrine, the Lanner is a very secretive and elusive bird and, even in the proximity of the nest, one rarely hears its call or glimpses its shape. Only with a lot of patience and experience one can have the opportunity to photograph this magnificent mediterranean bird. On a cloudy morning at 7 AM, after a full night spent in a hide to conceal my presence, a male comes to its perch; a blue rock trush in its claws. A few seconds later a much larger shape appears and, in a chaos of feathers and wings, takes the prey away: the female that was brooding in the nest claimed its breakfast. One reads it in books and sees it sometimes through the binoculars, but, still, I was very impressed by the difference in size among the two sexes.


Location: Marche, Italy

Tags: bruno damicis, endangered, falco biarmicus, italy, lanner, pair, prey



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Comments

  1. Werner said:

    05/05/2012 12:03

    Wow, Bruno: What a beautiful picture of a spectacular species. Great, great job!

  2. Jeremias said:

    05/05/2012 14:17

    wow - amazing

  3. João Petronilho said:

    06/05/2012 00:14

    Without doubt, a great photo that captures a precious moment in the life of this pair of birds of prey. My congratulations for your efforts which resulted in the image that we all can enjoy lounging comfortably on our sofa. For me, this is one of the great birds images I have seen!!

  4. Geir Ole said:

    06/05/2012 12:41

    Very special and nice picture! Well done :)

  5. Alex mustard said:

    08/05/2012 09:59

    Fantastic moment with an amazing species. Thank you so much fro sharing.